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Dr. Richard Alley's Research on Ice Sheets Helps Answer Climate Questions

 Flow of Research on Ice Sheets Helps Answer Climate Questions

 

UNIVERSITY PARK, PA. -- Just as ice sheets slide slowly and steadily into the ocean, researchers are returning from each trip to the Arctic and Antarctic with more data about climate change, including information that will help improve current models on how climate change will affect life on the earth, according to a Penn State geologist.

"It is not just correlation, it is causation," said Richard Alley, Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences. "We know that warming is happening and it's causing the sea levels to rise and if we expect more warming, we can expect the sea levels to rise even more."

Alley, who reports on his research today (Feb. 16) at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston, has studied the movement of ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic over the years. One way researchers are measuring climate change is by collecting data on how fast ice sheets are flowing toward the sea andcomparing those speeds over time, according to Alley.

Ice sheets are miles-thick, continent-wide layers of ice that spread toward the oceans. The researcher said that rising air temperature speeds melting in warmer parts of ice sheets, contributing to sea-level rise. Ocean warming can melt the floating ice shelves that form in bays and fjords around