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The Latest Edition of Voices of Central Pa

 

IN THIS ISSUE: 10 Reasons to visit the Bellefonte Ar t Museum | A closer look at local Arts Fest artists | People are a work of art | Fast, sustainable pasta from Fasta & Ravioli Co. | Ground Ivy - One of the great healing herbs | Local programs assisting sexual assault victims | Students call for education on sexual consent | A first-hand account of the Baltimore protests | A new day on the streets of Baltimore | Summer reading: Re-thinking the Beach Book | Canada Warbler, a bird of summer, eh! | College Boy graduates | A little forecasting competition | A piece of Eden to create food for the soul | Pennsylvania Organic FarmFest offers education | Fourth Annual Pa. Organic FarmFest kicks off August 7

Local programs assisting sexual assault victims

by: BRIANNA SHEA Bxs5176@psu.edu
 

Penn State has been rocked by a large number of sexual assault reports since the Jerry Sandusky scandal broke in November 2011. The college has taken initiatives to address this issue, offering services to those affected by sexual violence.
According to The Daily Collegian, President Eric Barron created the Task Force on Sexual Assault and Harassment in July 2014. The task force was asked to make recommendations to wipe out sexual violence. 
On January 29, 2015, the task force presented a list of 18 recommendations, including hiring a full-time Title IX coordinator and creating an office to handle Title IX violations. Title IX is a federal law that prohibits sex discrimination in education. Eleven of the 18 recommendations are set to be handled by the office tasked with investigating these violations.
According to news.psu.edu, Barron accepted the entire list of recommendations on February 17, 2015.
Penn State and the State College community offer an array of existing services to help survivors.
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Whistleblower intimidation at Penn State


Penn State Old Main Bell Tower. 

Photo by George Chriss//WIKIMEDIA COMMONS 

 

By: KATHERINE WATT
katherine_watt@hotmail.com

Corporate Penn State’s fortress of secrecy and whistleblower intimidation is starting to crack. It’s an excellent development. 

In a June 4 letter to the Centre Daily Times, Barry Fenchak wrote about an incident at the June 2 Penn State Town Hall meeting. An audience member “raised the issue of university employees’ fear of retaliation for reporting wrongdoing. In his response, Vice President of Finance and Business, David Gray, acknowledged what the recent university-wide employee survey confirmed: ‘that particular issue — sadly — was most deeply rooted within finance and business. ” 

Fenchak pointed out that Gray is responsible for several programs in addition to F&B, including the Office of Physical Plant (OPP), Human Resources, Diversity and Ethics. Gray is perfectly positioned to support and encourage whistleblowers. 

“Fear of retaliation for reporting concerns is also real and justified for

staff and faculty — non-tenure line and tenure line — across the university.” He concluded: “At Penn State, retaliation is not isolated; it is systemic. It is part of a suite of condign ‘management tools’ that are deeply embedded in this very hierarchical institution's DNA." - L.S. Finn 

 

But instead of acting decisively to set up and enforce whistleblower protections, he simply laments the sad situation for which he is primarily responsible. It brings to mind the maxim attributed to Albert Einstein: “Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity, but don't rule out malice.” 

Further evidence for the malice theory of whistleblower intimidation is the February appointment of Margaret Gray, David Gray’s wife, as Penn State’s new Director of Local Government and Community Relations. Between the two roles, they personify Penn State’s corporate strategy: control institutional revenue streams from student tuition, public subsidies, donations, and endowment investments, and stifle or manipulate all attempts at public oversight by local governments and civilians. 

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Local Woman Honored With UNA-USA Lifetime Achievement Award

Charles Dumas's photo.

Norma Keller Recognized for Her Commitment to Strong U.S.-UN Relations

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FERGUSON A Historical Perspective

Ferguson, Day 4, Photo 26


By Charles Dumas

           

         We were invited to a class taught by Courtney Morris, Asst. Prof. Anne Marie Mingo, Prof. Paul Taylor head of the African-American Studies Department. It was a workshop on the events around Ferguson.  Several police chiefs and Penn State officials also attended. The students had examined various aspects of the events in Ferguson, MO, focusing on: the police, the media, state officials,demonstrators, etc.

 

            Much attention has been paid to white police officers, killing unarmed African-American men.  Relatively little attention has been focused on the community reactions to the incidents after they have occurred. Thousands of people in Ferguson and across the nation participated in demonstrations,die-ins, and other expressions of community action. Almost all have been peaceful, the people exercising their Constitutional rights to assemble to petition the government about their grievances.  I believe there is no activity that better exemplifies the American character and spirit. It is part of our DNA. But, how do the demonstrations in Ferguson and elsewhere measure against similar instances of collective community action? Read more »

May 2015 Issue of Voices is out. No June issue planned.

The CNTRL College Lecture event featuring Richie Hawtin

CNTRL-Richie-hawtins-college-lectures.jpg


CNTRL: Individuality & Creativity In Technology-Based Music,

LECTURE INFO #CNTRLedu

​RICHIE HAWTIN proudly presents for 2015 CNTRL: Individuality & Creativity In Technology-Based Music, a college campus tour. Beginning April 15 in Boston, MA at Berklee College of Music and Middle East Downstairs, this innovative, inventive, and immersive experience will touch down at colleges and hot spots in eight major college markets across North America before finishing up in Los Angeles April 2 at UCLA and The Palladium.


Learn more about CNTRL here.

Richard "Richie" Hawtin (born June 4, 1970) is an English-born Canadian electronic musician and DJ who was an influential part of Detroit techno's second wave of artists in the early 1990s and a leading exponent of minimal techno since the mid-1990s.

Hawtin is known for DJing techno sets making use of laptop computers and digital mixing equipment. In May 1990 Hawtin and fellow second-waver John Acquaviva founded the Plus 8 record label, which they named after their turntable's pitch adjust function. In 1998, Hawtin launched M_nus Records.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richie_Hawtin

 

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The April 2015 issue of Voices is Out!

The March 2015 Issue of Voices is out.

The 1964 Democratic National Convention - Part 3- Memoir of a Civil Rights Activist


By Charles Dumas

NEW DAY
: For those of us who spent most of the Summer working on the Freedom Project,leaving rural Mississippi was like entering a brave new world filled with strange people and ideas.

            In the sixties the prevailing influence was the cold war, a conflict between the United States, and the Soviet Union (Russia) and Communist China.  The US and Soviets had been allies during World War II (WWII) but afterwards the two countries became engaged in a struggle for political and economic dominance. Both had a bounty of nuclear weapons, which they threatened to use if attacked. Both  recognized that a real military confrontation would most likely result in the annihilation of all human life on the planet. During that era every political event was framed in coldwar terms including the civil rights movement. Condemnations of being communist were hurled against the Movement and its leaders, even Dr. King. J. Edgar Hoover, the long time director of the FBI,was so convinced that the Movement had been infiltrated by communists, he spent large amounts of the government’s resources investigating civil rights leaders while often ignoring the white terrorist organizations, which were instigating and promulgating violence against civil rights workers.

            During this period America was also experiencing a period of great prosperity. The ravagesof WWII had destroyed the production apparatus of the major European and Asian industrial powers.  The US was the only country,which emerged with its industry intact. In fact, the US took on the task of helping to finance and rebuild European and Asian manufacturing capabilities through programs like the Marshall plan.

The February 2015 Issue of Voices is Out1

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